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MALTBY GENEALOGY

The Maltby Association
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BOOKLET TWO
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COMPILED BY THE SECRETARY
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ILLUSTRATED
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FEBRUARY 1ST, 1909
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MALTBY BOOKLET NUMBER TWO
Contents
PAGE
Coat-of-Arms
OUR CREST
2crest.jpg

Kinship (Poem) by Maude Townshend Maltby 5

MALTBY GENEALOGY

                  OUR PRESIDENT
 
2pres.jpg
9                 OUR PRESIDENT
 
     MR. GEORGE E. MALTBY, our President, is the
second child of Lucius and Sarah J. Parks Maltby.
He was born February 18th, 1830, in Pair Haven
(now a part of New Haven,) Connecticut.  As a boy
Mr. Maltby lived at home, going to school and helping
his father with the farm.  Later he became clerk in
Dr. Parker's drug store, being at the time eighteen
years of age.
     Three years later Mr. Maltby went into the drug
business for himself.  In May, 1852, he married
Elizabeth Broughton Magnire.  They had two
children, Edward Parks, and Mary Louise, Maltby,
Shortly after the above children were born the war
broke out and Mr. Maltby disposed of his drug
business and went South where for some time he
supplied General Grant's army with provisions.  Mr.
Maltby established an oyster business in Norfolk,
Virginia, and was the first to ship opened oysters in
bulk to New York; for a long time averaging five
hundred gallons a day.
     In 1864 Mr. Maltby lost his wife and for seven
years was a widower.  In 1871 he married Ruth
Atwater Bostwick, and to them were born Margaret
Atwater, George Erastus and Lucius Upson, Maltby.
     In 1878 Mr. Maltby and his family left Virginia
and went to New York to live, where the northern
branch of the oyster business was supervised by him.
Mrs. Maltby died in May, 1898, and soon after Mr.
Maltby gave up active business and now divides his
time between his older daughter, Mrs. Frederick S.
Smith of Chester, Connecticut, and his younger
daughter, Mrs. William M. Bernard of New York
City.
<A HREF="/maltby/2pg10.htm">Sketch of 1st Vice Photograph (and Photograph) 10
OUR FIRST VICE PRESIDENT
 
2vice.jpg
11                 OUR FIRST VICE PRESIDENT
 
     MR. WILLIAM HENRY MALTBIE, OUR 1st Vice
President, professor of mathematics at the Woman's
College of Baltimore, Maryland, was born in Toledo,
Ohio, Aug. 26, 1867.  Mr. Maltbie is a son of Silas
Benjamin and Angie Van Deman Maltbie.  He
graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1890;
A. M. 1892; fellow Johns Hopkins, 1894-5; Ph. D.,
same, 1895; married Dec. 19, 1904, Kate A. S. Mc-
Curley.  Professor of Mathematics, Hedding College,
Illinois, 1890-1; instr.  Feb.-Sept. 1895; associate
professor, 1895; professor, 1899, Woman's College of
Baltimore.  Member of Phi Beta Kappa, Am. Math.
Soc.  For address see Membership Roll. -- (Taken
from "Who's Who in America, 1908-9.")
 
<A HREF="/maltby/2pg12.htm">Gen. Isacc Maltby (Photograph) 12
 
[[image:2gen.jpg]]
 
<A HREF="/maltby/2pg13.pdf">Third Annual Report (with Illustrations) 13
 
13

The Maltby Association. :

     OFFICERS
MR. GEORGE E. MALTBY, . . . . . . . . . . . . .   President
MR. W. H. MALTBIE, . . . . . . . . . . . 1st Vice President
MRS. JOHN P. VICTORY, . . . . . . . . .  2d  Vice President
MRS. JAMES WILLEY TODD, . . . . . . . . . . . .   Treasurer
MRS. CLARENCE VERRILL, . . . .    Secretary and Genealogist
 

The Third Annual Report

    The end of January, nineteen hundred and nine
marks the completion of the third year of life for the
Maltby Association, and as we look back upon our
beginning with its doubts and fears, its struggles and
trials, then glance at our present membership roll,
should we not all feel just a bit pleased with the
result of our labors?
    In view of the increased membership it seems not
unfitting that a few words should appear in Booklet
Two which would give members, especially the new
members, some slight idea of our history and our
work; how we came to exist, and so on.
    In February, nineteen hundred and six, two or
three of the Maltby cousins were brought to face
with these questions--Who was going to care for the
tombstones of the early ancestors?  Who- was going
to preserve the family records?  What was to become
of the few old relics and Maltby homesteads?  Were
no photographs to be taken, that these might be pre-
served to posterity?  and many similar queries.  The
result of all this was that those few undertook to
interest other cousins, and to form a Maltby Associa-
tion--bound together through the tie of blood, to
accomplish these several things.
 
 
2todd.jpg
                  SECRETARY'S REPORT
 
    There were twenty-seven orginal members--all
joining during February and March of 1906.
    At the end of the year
 

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg29.pdf">In Memoriam 29
IN MEMORIAM






IN MEMORIAM 31

GEORGE W. MALTBY
------

The following obituary is taken from the “Buffalo Evening News.” Of July 1. 1908:
“BUSINESS MAN OF NATIONAL FAME PASSES AWAY.
------

GEORGE W. MALTBY DIED THIS MORNING AT HIS HOME IN THIS CITY.
“He was one of the old type of business men with whom if you had a contract; you wouldn’t need to put it in writing,” was the remark evoked from a prominent business man by the announcement of the death of George W. Maltby at his home at 3:30 o’clockthis morning. Among the tributes to his memory by legions of friends, no encomium will ring truer than this. But it is conceded by all who knew him that business honesty was only an incidental characteristic and one that was regarded as a matter of course by Mr. Maltby. That was the rough stone of his character—“square-hewn and polished for a grand and sterling character.” * * * Mr. Maltby was born in West Henrietta, Monroecounty. N.Y., in 1845. When not seventeen he enlisted as a private in Company H. of the 108th New York Volunteer Infantry and served with Gen. Winfield Scott at Antietam, Gettysbury and Spottsylvania Court House.
He was all day on the battlefield of Antietam, “the bloodiest day of the whole war,” and though wounded he struck to his regiment. At Gettysbury he was hit by splinters of a shell, and in the death carnival at Spottsylvania, his left hand was so shattered by a




IN MEMORIAM 32

bullet he could no longer carry a musket. This injury disabled him from active service and he was confined in the SatterleeMilitaryHospitalat Philadelphiauntil his discharge in November, 1864. For months he ministered with his one hand to his sick and dying comrades in the long wards of SatterleeHospital, finally becoming head nurse.
Returning from the army, 19 years old at this time, Mr. Maltby decided to continue his studies, and took a course in a business college at Rochester. In 1865 he entered the firm of Whitmore, Carson & Co., Rochester, dealers in cut stone. In 1880 Mr. Maltby came to Buffalo, entering partnership with Gilbert Brady of Rochester, under the name Brady and Maltby. The partnership was continued until the death of Mr. Brady in 1896. Mr. Maltby was in business alone until 1904, when he took his two sons, James C. and William Maltby into partnership, under the name of George W. Maltby and Sons.
Memorials of Mr. Maltby’s life work exist in monuments of cut stone all over the country. He furnished and dressed the stone for the McKinley Monument in Niagara Square, also for the McKinley National Memorial at Canton, including the interior work and sarcophagus; the Historical Society’s Building; the Albright Art Gallery; the bridge over Park Lake, Gate’s Circle, the entrance of Forest Lawn, the First Presbyterian Church, the new addition to the Buffalo Club and the Ontario Power Company’s building at Niagara Falls
Mr. Maltby was a member of Bidwell-Wilkeson Post, G. A. R., the Union Veteran Legion, and Queen City Lodge. F. & A. M. He was a trustee of the






IN MEMORIAM 33

Blocher Home, former president of the Builder’s Exchange and a member of the Chamber of Commerce. He was also a member of the Plymount M. E. Church.
On Aug. 27, 1865, Mr. Maltby married Miss Mary J. Pierce, daughter of Caleb Pierce of Rochester. His widow, a daughter, Mrs. D. J. Perry, and two sons, James C. and William C. Maltby, survive him.

(The above extracts are taken from the Christian Advocate as well as from the Buffalo Evening News.)








SILAS BENJAMIN MALTBIE,
Mr. Silas B. Maltbie, of Baltimore, was the oldest child of Harrison and Susanah Darling Maltbie, and was born Sept. 4, 1835. In 1864 he married Angie Van Deman. Their only child is Mr. W. H. Maltbie our first Vice President. Mr. Silas B. Maltbie died Nov. 7, 1908, of arterial sclerosis, aged 73 years.







IN MEMORIAM 35



DEACON WILLIAM MALTBY.


Deacon William Maltby, of Horthford, Conn., was the first child of Henry and Ruth Hart Maltby, and was born March 19th, 1825. He married Esther Hall, daughter of Dr. Pierce and Ester Hall, Hall of Wallingford.

The following is a short extract from a sketch of Mr. Maltby’s life, which appeared in a local paper at the time of his death:

“In the death of Deacon William Maltby, the town loses one of its oldest and best citizens. In his younger days, he was a school-teacher and taught school in Wallingfordand other towns. Later, he settled on the farm. He represented his town in the state legislature in 1881. He was a member of the school board for thirty-five years, and for over forty years was a deacon in the Congregational church.”

Deacon Maltby was a descendant of Samuel (2) whose tombstone is shown on another page. Deacon Maltby died May 31, 1908, age 83 years. He is survived by his widow, and two daughters.











Deaths of Members.


1. MRS. RICHARD LONG. Died January 3, 1906, aged 32 years.

2. MR. GEORGE W. MALTBY. Died July 1, 1908, aged 63 years.

3. MR. HENRY E. MALTBY. Died ----1906, aged 49 years.

4. MR. OLIVER ELLSWORTH MALTBY. Died October, 1907, aged 80 years.

5. MR. SILAS BENJAMIN MALTBIE. Died Nov. 7, 1908, age 73 years.

6. DEACON WILLIAM MALTBY. Died May 31, 1908, aged 83 years.


7. MRS. JUSTIN W. MEACHAM. Died Sept. 12, 1907, aged 64 years.



<A HREF="/maltby/2pg39.pdf">Biographies 39
BIOGRAPHICAL














For the following sketch of Rev. Maltbie Babcock, we are indebted to his aunt. Mrs. Armstrong Maltbie (Annie C. Maltbie.)










BIOGRAPHICAL 39

Maltbie Davenport Babcock

Rev. Maltbie Davenport Babcock, D.D., was born at Syracuse, N. Y.., August 3d, 1858. He was the eldest son of Henry Babcock and Emily Maria Maltbie. Her father was the Rev. Ebenezer Davenport Maltbie, son of Davie Maltbie and Nancy Davenport of Stamford, Conn., who was the lineal descendant of Rev. John Davenport of New Haven, Conn. Emily Maria Maltbie’s mother was Mary Ann Davis, daughter of Rev. Henry Davis D. D., and Hannah Phoenix Tredwell.
There were many generations of the most prominent, refined and cultivated men and women behind Dr. Bobcock and he went forth to his life work from an ideal home. His maternal great grandfather and his grandfather were both Presbyterian clergymen. He was the eldest of seven children, and his mother’s widespread religious influence, and her beautiful life still speak in many of the influential circles of his native city. Here he was educated, taking his classical course at SyracuseUniversity, and his theological course at Auburn Seminary. In both of these institutions he won highest honors and hosts of friends.
Dr. Babcock received immediate recognition in the front rank of his denomination, his first settlement being at Lockport, N. Y. It was not only his brilliant intellect and his stirring oratorical powers that commanded admiration, for his ministry was ideal and no pastor in the land was more beloved. The man was everywhere regarded as a personal friend,




BIOGRAPHICAL 40

so cordial, so frank, so cheerful was he always, and so thoroughly unselfish. His influence became in the best sense national. His theology was like his vocal delivery, simple and direct. It was one soul speaking to another. His prayers voiced the cry of a man who wanted help from his FATHER. Dr. Babcock could not do anything just as anyone else would. “To divide burdens and centralize responsibility is the ark of accomplishment;” this was his rule in doing his varied work, and it gave him his almost supreme executive ability. Perhaps there was no greater tribute to his power and consecration than the fact that he was invariably turned to, as a sort of last resort in the attempt to bring a wandering soul to CHRIST. Often men said: “Let us get him under Dr. Babcock’s influence; he can surely reach him.” Dr. Babcock was a very versatile man; exceedingly attractive in physique, pleasant in manner, with a soul that reflected GOD.
Dr. Babcock was a clear thinker, and a fluent speaker. He was noted for his broad and impartial charity, and his vast array of friends among the young men of his country. He reached the people in so many ways. His personal magnetism was marvelous. Those who heard him were entranced and he was called to speak at all great religious gatherings, from one end of the country to the other and crowds, young and old, hung upon his lips. Taught of the SPIRIT, he revealed to them the open heaven and the message of JEHOVAH.
Dr. Babcock never published a book. He lived or sang his thoughts. He was a great lover of music, played many instruments extremely well, improvised delightfully and also wrote many songs and hymns which have been published and have won instant recognition as splendid work. But the


BIOGRAPHICAL 41

watchword of his life was: “This one thing I do;” to honor his MASTER and to save souls. His poems are of unquestioned excellence and have been said to resemble those of Emerson. They have been published in connection with a memorial volume of extracts from sermons and addresses, gathered by his grief stricken widow, entitled “Thoughts for Every Day Living.” His foreign letters, written while last abroad; to the men of the BrickChurchin New York Citywere also published.
What Dr. Babcock’s work was in Baltimoreit is simply impossible to estimate in an article as brief as this or to speak of the breadth and reach of that wonderful pastorate in New York. His acquaintance was cosmopolitan; and it knew no denominational bond, and was met by a distinguished hospitality to which his wife, the daughter of a prominent Poughkeepsielawyer, added both beauty and charm. What Dr. Babcock was in his home only those who lived with him and loved him, upon whom his devotion was showered can tell. At the time of his death, at Naples, Italy, May 18, 1901, in his forty-third year, the papers both religious and secular teemed with statements proving in every way his remarkable power.
One who knew Dr. Babcock intimately said: “The only relief in the mystery of his untimely death it seemed to me, was in the fact that his character and work were of such POTENCY that they must reproduce themselves in the living.




BIOGRAPHICAL 43











For this sketch of Mrs. Harlow Swain Love (Martha Church Maltby) we are indebted to her daughter, Mrs. Frederick E. Foster. Mrs. Love was a daughter of General Isaac Maltby, whose portrait appears on page 12.




44 BIOGRAPHICAL

1 2 3 4
William Daniel Benjamin Isaac

Martha Church Maltby
(MRS. HARLOW SWAIN LOVE)

Was the youngest of the ten children of Gen. Isaac Maltby and Lucinda Murray, his wife, who was the daughter of Gen. Seth Murray, an officer during the entire war of the Revolution, and who participated in all of the early engagements and was present at the Battle of Bennington, and also at the surrender of Burgoyne. She was borne in Hatfield, Mass. Her parents removed to Waterloo, N. Y., when she was but two years of age, and upon her marriage to Mr. Harlow S. Love, their home was established in Buffalo, N. Y., where all of her five children were born. Prior to 1860 the family made several trips to California by the way of Panama, and in that year they located permanently n San Francisco, where Mr. Love, until his death in 1866, was a prominent member of the legal profession, and where, later, her son John became the Attorney General of the state of California and subsequently the City and County Attorney of San Francisco.
Mrs. Love was a person of great intellectuality, refinement and cultivation, and of a lovely and graceful presence. She was endowed I an eminent degree with all those tender attributes which endear a woman to the circle of her familiar friends, and possessed that gentleness and benevolence of character which purifies and softens the social atmosphere of her surroundings. To these qualities were united an unostentatious charity and helpfulness which all of her




BIOGRAPHICAL 45

intimates have reason to remember with affectionate gratitude. Her literary attainments were of a high order; and for many years she contributed to the public prints articles on various subjects, which were widely read and favorably received. She also devoted much labor and attention to genealogical research, and was instrumental in tracing and rescuing from oblivion the lines of her descent from Colonial and Revolutionary ancestors, all of whom were of distinguished stock.
Mrs. Love crossed the Pacific Ocean numerous times, visiting Hong Kong, China, on the occasion of the marriage of her daughter Leila to William Hammond Foster, Jr., (a member of the celebrated Americad house of Russell & Co., Caina,) and some years later making her home with her youngest daughter Martha, the wife of Frederick E. Foster, successively in Yokohama, Japan, and Hong Kong, China, where Mr. Foster represented, as General Agent, the trans-Pacific lines of steamers plying between those ports and San Francisco. Mrs. Love and her husband are interred in Lone Mountain Cemetery, San Francisco, California, and are survived (in 1908) only by their daughter Martha (Mrs. F. E. Foster) now residing in Mount Vernon. N. Y.
The following condensed biography of Gen. Isaac Maltby (4), whose portrait appears on page 12, was very kindly furnished the Association by Mrs. Frederic Emory Foster, his grand-daughter.
Major Seth Murray Maltby referred to in the sketch was the father of Mr. George Beecher Maltby and Mrs. A. T. Higby whose names will be found in the roll of members.




46 BIOGRAPHICAL

Gen. Isaac Maltby

Born November 10, 1767; graduated at YaleCollege1786. He was the son of Benjamin Maltby of Northford and Branford, Conn., and Elizabeth Fowler, his wife. He was a student of divinity with Dr. Smalley of New Britain, Conn., and was admitted to the church in that place July 12, 1789, and licensed to preach the same year, by New Haven, East. He married Nov. 10, 1790, at Hatfield, Mass., Lucinda Murray, the only child of Seth Murray, who was a Brigadier General in the Hampshire Militia in the time of the Revolutionary War, and he was persuaded to settle with his father-in-law in Hatfield. He served as representative from Hatfield in the Massachusetts Legislature 1809-10; was the author of three books on Military Science, viz: “Elements of War,” “Military Tactics” and “Court Martial;” twice chosen Presidential Elector at a period in American history when the Electoral College was composed of notable men and when it was intended to select deliberately the President of the United States. He served through the war of 1812 and was made Brigadier General in 1813, with headquarters at Boston, his son Seth Murray Maltby being paymaster in the same brigade with the rank of major. In 1818 he removed to Waterloo, Seneca county, N. Y. where he died the following year (1819.)



BIOGRAPHICAL 47

Capt. Jonathan Maltbie 3d

Through the kindness of Miss Emily A. Lynes of Norwalk, Conn., we have secured a photograph of the tombstone of Capt. Jonathan Maltbie of Revolutionary War fame. The stone of his wife Elizabeth (Allen) Maltbie will be seen beside his.
Miss Lones endeavored to obtain a photograph of Capt. Jonathan Maltby’s commission, signed by General Washington, and also one of Capt. Maltbie’s old homestead in Fairfield, Conn. We regret not being able to print them in Booklet Two but hope to do so later.
The sketch of Jonathan Maltbie, 3d, written by Miss Lynes, will be found intensely interesting by all the members, we feel sure.

“My great grandfather, Jonathan Maltbie, 3d, the picture of whose grave accompanies this sketch, was the only child of Jonathan Jr. and Abigail Holmes Maltbie, born at Stamford, Conn., December 17, 1744. He moved to Fairfield, Conn., and married Elizabeth the daughter of David and Sarah (Gold) Allen Oct. 23d, 1768. He was a sea captain in the East Indiatrade, and lived in one of the historical houses given in the “History of Fairfield Count” as “Colonial No.4.” This house was built in 1766 by Isaac Tucker, who sold it to Captain Maltbie who owned and occupied it during Revolutionary times, and was one of the few house left standing at the burning of Fairfield. Mr. Henry Rowland, a grandson, in writing some reminiscences, states that “grandfather




48 BIOGRAPHICAL

Maltbie’s (house) was reserved for a cook house. After the conflagration the inhabitants returned (when the British had gone on board their ships.) Grandfather Maltbie on returning to his house found all their valuable china scooped off the shelves on to the floor and broken into pieces and everything upside down. In the kitchen in the fireplace hung a large brass kettle filled with their hams, but they dare not eat them, fearing that they were poisoned, (so they started anew with provisions.)” Captain Maltbie’s son William inherited this place and sold it to Justin Hobart. The house is still standing today in good condition. Jonathan Maltbie was 1st Lieutenant of the “Trumbull,” one of the first cruisers built for the Continental navy; Dudley Saltonstall, Commander. She went into service about April, 1780, carrying 28 guns and her crew numbered 200. Her first engagement under Captain Nicholson, occurred June 2d of the same year; with the “Watt,” an English letter-of-marque, under Captain Colehart. She carried 34 guns and 250 men. The “Watt,” a private vessel with a cargo of great value, and was especially equipped to fight her way. This was the first action of any moment that occurred in 1780 and had the reputation of being the most obstinate and sanguinary naval battle during the Revolution. The “Trumbull” being badly disabled failed to capture the “Watt,” although she defeated her. The next summer, 1781, she left the Delaware, still under Captain Nicholson, having been thoroughly equipped as convoy to 28 sail of merchant craft bound for CapeFrancois, West Indies. Off the capes the “Trumbull” met three British cruisers astern. Two of them, on being a frigate, stood for the “Trumbull”—




49




50 BIOGRAPHICAL

which ship by hauling up gained the wind of them. While standing on in this manner, hoping everything from the darkness, which was fast approaching, a gale carried away the ‘Trumbull’s” fore top mast, which, in falling, brought down the main gallant mast. She was otherwise disabled and night coming on was unable to clear up the wreck. At 10 o’clockthe Iris, 32 guns, one of the vessels in chase, closed with her and forced her to combat. In the midst of rain and tempestuous winds Captain Nicholson found himself obliged to go to quarters or to strike, without resistance. He preferred to do the first, but the English volunteers on board his ship, instead of obeying orders, went below, extinguished lights and secreted themselves. Near half the remaining men followed their example and Captain Nicholson could not muster fifty of even the diminished crew he had at the guns. The battle that followed might almost be said to have been fought by the officers. These brave men sustained by a party of the petty officers and seamen managed a few of the guns for more than an hour, when the “General Monk” 18 guns, coming up and joining in the fire of the “Iris,” the “Trumbull” submitted. The “Trumbull,” after her capture, was towed into New Yorkharbor and condemned. Though unsuccessful in her battles, she still fought two of the most famous fights that took place on the ocean during the exciting times of the Revolution. Jonathan Maltby was afterwards appointed Master of the “Argus,’ a cutter in the service of the United Statesfor the protection of the revenue. He died Feb. 11th, 1798, while in command of this vessel, and was buried in




BIOGRAPHICAL 51

the old cemetery at Fairfield, Conn. The date of Jonathan Maltbie’s commission as 1st Lieutenant—Oct. 12th, 1776. Date of commission as Captain by George Washington—March 21st, 1791. These commissions were in the family of his son William who lived in the South, and were said to have been given to some Historical Society.”


<A HREF="/maltby/2pg49.htm">Tombstones of Capt. Jonathan Maltbie and Elizabeth, His Wife (Photograph) 49


<A HREF="/maltby/2pg52.pdf">Sketch of Branford, Conn 52
52 MALTBY BOOKLET NO. TWO

Sketch of Branford, Connecticut.

Many of the descendants have expressed a wish to known something about Branford of the early days, and the following sketch, taken from an essay written by Miss Olive Hall pond of Branford, gives us a very good idea of the Branford our early ancestors knew.
“At first, the chief occupation was farming, but the people soon found the land was not remarkable for its fertility. Branford harbor was then much deeper than it is at the present time, and furnished excellent facilities for ships engaging in trade with the West Indies. Consequently, merchandise from foreign ports was brought to Branford and was then carried over the hills to New Haven, which at the time did not have a good harbor.
Trading necessitated the building of ships. Vessels suitable to transport merchandise to all parts of the world were built where the swimming pool at Mill Plain is now located,’ etc.
“It is interesting to picture the town as we find it in the year 1700” 9ten years prior to the death of William Maltby,) “The green was then, as now, the center of the town. Large rocks, boulders, and tall grass completely covered it.
There was but one church, which stood where the town hall does today. This was called the new meeting house, the first having been built on the site of the cemetery and surrounded by a high stockade, as a protection from hostile Indians.




A SKETCH OF BRANFORD 53

Scattered around the green were the “Sabbath Day Houses.” They were used by families who came from a long distance. They afforded the people places to rest and warm themselves during the noon hour, for the church services there lasted nearly all day.
Two other conspicuous structures on the green were the blacksmith shop and the whipping post. The shop stood in the hollow back of the church, the whipping post and public stocks on the hill where the Baptist church now stands.
There were but few public highways, the chief of which led from New Haven through the town of Branford to Guilford. Mantowese street, named from the Indians, ran as now from the center to the river. Here it turned, following the present course of the railroad, thence back to the green. A street upon which the minister and several officials of the town lived, led from Montowese street, east to the river, somewhat similar to Averill avenue. This was called “Pig Lane.”
The first post-office with public store combined, stood on the site of the Lock works. This hollow formed the principal business section of Branford.
The kindergarten, grammar and high school combined, consisted of one building, the academy, which now stands, the only remaining relic of former days.
It is most amusing to notice some of the customs and restrictions of that time. Chief among these were the church laws. Sunday morning a drum was beaten to call the members to church. Every person who did not attend, arrive on time, and stay until the service was over, was heavily fined. Besides this




54 A SKETCH OF BRANFORD

a man was hired to go among the congregation, during the service and prevent them from going to sleep. This he accomplished by means of a long pole. Any weary mortal who chanced to close his eves for a moment’s rest would receive a vigorous poke of the pole, with a command to wake up and listen to the words of the Gospel.
On this day the green was transformed into a lively scene. The farmers and their entire families drove into town in their large open wagons; one man coming all the way from Northford, regularly attended with his wife and 26 children.
Another law of special importance, the fines for the violation of which would make Branford of today very wealthy, if the law were enforced, was what was known in England as the curfew law. This stated that the streets must be vacated, fires banked and every man in his home at 10 o’clock.”



The above interesting sketch of Miss Pond’s gives one a very good idea of the town of Branford in the early days—the town as it was when the home of our emigrant ancestor, William Maltby.


<A HREF="/maltby/2pg55.pdf">Sketch of William Maltby, "Esqre." 55
WILLIAM MALTBY, ESQ.
----------
1645---1710
----------

Our Emigrant Ancestor.
In the year 1645, as we learn from his tombstone * our emigrant ancestor, William Maltby, was born. Where he was born, and who were his parents is not as yet known, though recent searches in Englandgive us strong clues towards answering these questions. What these clues are will be found in another part of this booklet. We know but little of his family. He had a brother John, probably older, who emigrated to New Englandwith him. There was a near relative named Robert Maltbye, as a deed of land of William’s is dated Branford, April, 1673, and is witnessed by one Robert Maltbye.
The “Dwight Strong Genealogy” states on page 354, “John Maltby, Sr., came with his brother William, both of the rank of gentleman,’ from Yorkshire, England, to New Haven, about 1670.”
It may be that the emigrants were not direct from Yorkshire, but it seems almost certain that they were of the Yorkshire Maltbys. If we can prove this fact we shall have established our descent from one of the oldest families in England—descending probably form “Crowned Heads.” Hugo de Maltby held lands in Englandat the time of the Norman Conquest and


*A reproduction of William Maltby’s Tombstone appears with the secretary’s second annual report published in the latter part of this Booklet.



56 OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR

it is so recorded in the Doomsday Book. Prior to this, the Maltbys were undoubtedly Danes, and came down in the Viking ships, landing on the northeastern coast of England. The name Maltby shows the Danish origin—by meaning town—and the malt may have meant grain, or some think it is derived from mael—mahel—mill.
What the life of William and John Maltby was in Englandwe can only surmise. They evidently lived near the coast and were probably sea-faring people. If fact it seems very probable that they left Englandin their own ships, and sailed for the New Worldvia the West Indies. Probably they had relatives living in the West Indiesas we know that Christopher Maltby, alderman of York, buried his wife in St. Croixabout the year 1600. Mrs. Christopher had a sister Jane, married in 1604, and it seems to the writer, that they were very probably nearly related to the father of William Maltby.
We know that our American Maltbys had interests in the West Indiesas we find in the Inventory of the estate of William Maltby Jr.:

35 13 7 ½
The Estate Dr.to Mr. John
Morris, for freight, 17 3
84

M. Maltbie, widow, April 20, 1701 18 10 4 ½
(Note—Mr. John Morris was probably his father-in-law, as he married Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. John Morris.)
As we have been unable to secure facts pertaining




OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR 57

to the early life of our emigrant ancestor we have had to resort to deduction, and after many years of studying the situation, the following ideas have been woven together. Probably the father of William and John died when they were small, or we should have had some information as to their father’s name—or we should probably find William or John being called “Junior.” From the names of William’s children we con form some idea as to what his parents were named. Let us look at these names:
1. John Maltby, b……. (perhaps named for his father.
2. Jane Maltby, b…….(perhaps for his wife Hannah or Jane.)
3. Mary Maltby, b. 1672 mother.
4. William Maltby, b. 1673, for himself-perhaps his grandfather
5. Elizabeth, born 1676, (perhaps a near relative.)
6. Daniel Maltby, b. 1679
7. Samuel Maltby, b. 1693 ! (evidently Bishop
8. Jonathan Maltby, b. 1698 ! family names.)

(The above names are given here so they may be compared with those found in the English research work on another page.)
Suppose their father to have died early in life, and possibly their mother married again, it would have left the emigrants with few home ties, and a natural step would be for them to seek their fortune in the New World, and especially so, if they already had relatives in the West Indies.
It will be noticed that no dates of birth are given for John (2), Jane (2), and this is because we do not know where they were born. They might have been born in England, or the West Indies. Neither do we know where William Maltby was married, but we feel very sure that the name of his first wife was Hannah—as we find William and Hannah Maltby together joining the church in Branford in the year 1688. Where Hannah Maltby died is not known, though she was living in 1689-90 as she signs as witness a deed of John Yales, at this date.




58 OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR

I believe the earliest record found of William Maltby is the birth of his daughter Mary, born in 1672, and recorded in New Haven, Conn.
The earliest mention of the name as yet found is under date 1664 when “I” (probably J.) Maltbie witnessed a deed for Alexander Bryan. (Alexander Bryan was the grandfather of Mary Bryan, who later married John Maltby the emigrant.)
It is interesting to know something of the social standing and prosperity of our emigrant ancestor in New England, and this can best be done by quoting various authors:
“Among the men who came to Branford soon after the Newarkexodus (about 1666) were Eleazer Stent, William Rosewell, William Maltbie and Samuel Pond. They became especially prominent”—Baldwin in his Brantford Annals (N. H. Hist. Soc. Papers, Vol. III, p. 265) and on page 270:
“The Wilfords, Maultbies, Bakers and Johnsons, that are leading names in Brantfordat this time, were of the merchant class and apparently wealthy. They became large land holders.
The Society at Branford at this time must have been most select, comprising the governor and others named,” etc.
Annals of Branford, page 300: “Large and most substantial houses were erected by the new settlers, some of whom were possessed of considerable property. This was especially true of the Bartholomews, Maltbies, Wilfords, Greys, Stents, Goulds, Bakers, Barnes and Bladestones. * * * The Hoadley, Maltbie, Rose, Foote and Harrison families present so many names that were prominently identified with




OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR 59

the Church, Town and business during this period, time fails me to speak individually of them.”
There are many other records, private and public to show that the Maltbys were a prominent Connecticutfamily.
William Maltby’s public life can best be shown by quoting from the “Public Records of Connecticut.”
In these records his name is variously recorded as:
Maultbey—Maltbey—Malbye—Maltby—Malby—Maltbie and Malbury.

Page 2—Special Courtheld at HartfordAug 29, 1689– Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford.
Page 3—A General Court at HartfordOct 16, 1689, Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford, Deputy.
Page 15—Gen. Courtat HartfordApril 11, 1690; Mr. Wm. Maltby for Branford.
Page 23—Gen. Courtat HartfordMay 8, 1690; Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford.
Page 42—Court of Election at HartfordMay 14, 1691; Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford.
Page 54—Special Courtat HartfordJuly 9, 1691; Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford.
Page 55—Gen. Courtat Hartford Oct. 8, 1691; Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Brantford.
Page 105—Gen, Court at HartfordOct, 12, 1693, Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford.
Page 120—Court of Election at HartfordMay 10, 1694; Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford.
Page 149—Gen. Courtat HartfordOct. 10, 1695; Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford.
Page 158—Gen. Courtat HartfordMay 14, 1696; Mr. Malbie for Branford.
Page 174—Gen. Courtat HartfordOct. 8, 1696; Mr. William Maltbie, for Branford.
Page 197—Court of Election May 13, 1697; Mr. Will Malbie, for Branford.
Page 221—Gen. Assembly at HartfordOct. 14, 1697; William Maltbie, for Branford.
Page 235—Gen. Courtat HartfordJan 22, 1697, Mr. Will Malbury, for Branford.
Page 244—Court of Election May 16, 1698; Mr. William Malbie, for Branford.
Page 283—Gen. Assembly at HartfordMay 11, 1699; Mr. Will Malbye, for Branford.




60 OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR

Page 296—Gen. Assembly at HartfordOct. 12, 1699, Mr. Will Malbye, for Branford.
Page 327—Gen. Assembly at HartfordOct. 10, 1700, Mr. Will Malbye, for Branford.
Page 342—Court of Election at HartfordMay 8, 1701, Mr. William Malbie, for Branford.
Page 351—Gen. Ass. At New HavenOct. 9, 1701, Mr. William Malbie, for Branford.
Page 372—Gen. Ass. At HartfordMay 14, 1702, Mr. William Malbie, for Branford.
Page 395—Gen. Ass. At New HavenOct. 8, 1702, Mr. Will Maltbie, for Branford.
Page 407—Court of Election, HartfordMay 13, 1703, Mr. Will Malbie for Branford.
Page 499—Gen. Assembly, HartfordMay 10, 1705, Mr. William Maltbie for Branford.
Page 521—Act passed at Gen. Assembly at New Haven, Oct, 11, 1705, Mr. Will Malbye for Branford
Page 532—At Gen. Assembly, Hartford, May 9, 1706, Mr. William Malbie. ---- etc ----- “Are by this Assembly appointed to be Justices of the Peace and Quorum in the Countie of Newhaven.
Page 35—Vol. III (?) 1690, ?Mr. Wm. Maltby is confirmed Ensigne of Brandford train brand, and is to be commissioned accordingly.”
Page 18—April 1690. “This Court have upon the desire of Brandford, chose Mr. Malbey and Lnt. Stent to be commissioners for Brandford, and they were sworn accordingly.”
Page 24—May 1690, “These were made Commissioners for the year ensueing for Branford—Stent and Mr. Maltby.”
Page 43—May 1691. The Court appointed these for Commissioners in the severall plantations Mr. Wm. Maltby and Lnt. Eben. Stent for Brandford.
Page 92—May 1693, These were chosen Commissioners for the year ensueing, Mr. Wm. Maultbey and Lnt. Ebenzer Stent, for Brandford.”
Page 121—May 1694, These Commissioners were chosen for the year ensueing Lnt. Eben. Stent and Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Brandford.
Page 201—May 1697, Commissioners for Brandford, Mr. Will Malbie, Capt. Ebenzer Stent.
Page 260—May 1698, Justice appointed for the Countie of Newhaven, Mr. Will Malbie, of the Quorum.
Page 317—May, 1701—Justice of the Peace and Quorum appointed for Newhaven Countie—Mr. William Malbie




OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR 61

Page 378—May, 1702, Justice of Peace and Quorum, Mr. William Malbie.
Page 414—May, 1703, Justice of Peace and Quorum, William Malbie, Esqre.
Page 467—May, 1704, Justice of Peace and Quorum, William Malbie.
Page 468—May, 1705, Justice of Peace and Quorum, William Malbie.
Page 532—May, 1706, Justice of Peace and Quorum, William Malbie.
Page 56, (Vol,--) A.D 1691. The list of estates for the Colony are 321 persons—
L15,622, 00 00. This Court appoint Capt. Niccols, Mr. Maltby, Mr. Eliphalet Hill, and John Chapman to be a comitte to perfect the say’d lists that are imperfect and to return them to the Court.
Page 226, Oct. 1667—In answer to the petition of Mr. Samll. Ha!….? This Court doth desire and appoint Majr. Moses Mansfield, Majr. James Fitch. Mr. Will Malbie, Mr. Josiah Rossiter and Capt. Thomas Clark, they or the majr. Part of them, to be a comitte to indeoom an accommodation and agreement between the towns of Fairfield and Norwalk concerning their dividing line, and other maters of controversie, with reference to propertie of land,” etc., etc.
Page 258, May, 1698—This Court made choice of Capt. Samll. Mason, Mr. William Pitkin, Mr. John Chester, Mr. John Woolcutt, Mr. Will Malby, to frame such bills as they shall judge needful either for emendation of laws formerly made, or for making other laws that are now wanting in the government and to exhibit the same in Court.”

The Colony records furnish other interesting records of William Maltby, but we have not the volumes at hand, nor does space allow further quotations. Enough has been said to show that our emigrant ancestor held a prominent place in the public affairs of his day.
It is not generally known that the prefix “Esqre.” And “Mr.” Were not applied in the early days as they are now, promiscuously. In connection with the above Colony records it might be interesting to know something of what a prefix of respect meant in the early days. They following item is taken from the




62 OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR

“Tuttle Family Genealogy.” The title Hon. Was entirely unknown in our records until 1685, and subsequently for many years was applied only to the Governor, and seldom even to him. The next title was that of Esqre., and meant the same as in Englandtemp. Elizabeth and James I.
Mr. Thomas Wells was magistrate for 17 years, deputy governor one year, and was chosen Gov. the 2d time before he was distinguished with Esq. The next title was Gentleman, but seems to have been soon discarded in Connecticut. The prefix Master (Mr.) belonged to all gentlemen, including those designated by the higher modes of rank. Master corresponds very nearly to the English word gentleman. In Connecticutit embraced clergymen, and planters of good family and estate who were members of the Gen. Court, those bred at an university and those of sufficient education to manage the general affairs of the Colony, civil or ecclesiastical, and who had been sufficiently well born. Comparatively few of the representatives of the town, even though they might be returned year after year, were honored with the title. To be called Mr. Or to have one’s name recorded by the Secretary with the prefix 200 years ago was a more certain index of the rank of the individual as respects birth, education and good moral character than any one of the high sounding titles with which many men of no merit whatever, in our day of swift locomotion are content to cajole others in order that they may be enriched in their turn with the same spurious currency. It may be observed by reference to our colonial records that there were scores of men of good family and in honorable stations




OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR 63

Who still did not possess all the requisite qualities of Master. It was seldom that young men of whatever rank were called Master. Sir was sometimes applied to young gentlemen undergraduates at a college. Mrs. Was applied to the wives of Masters and also to unmarried females of the higher class.
Military titles were considered of a very high order. Previous to 1654 the highest military officer in the colony was Captain.”—Hollister’s Hist. Of Conn.
Palfrey in Hist. Of N. Eng.Says: There was great punctiliousness in the application of both official and conventional titles. Only a small number of persons of the best condition (always including ministers and their wives) had Mr. Or Mrs. Prefixed to their names. ….Wm. Bradford, though at the head of the Bridgewater, Mass., proprietors, a son of the Gov., and himself often Lieut. Cov., was not entitled to “Mr.”


A word as to the “worldly goods” possessed by our emigrant ancestor. The inventory of his personal estate was taken November 2d, 1710, and it assets.
£1058, 7s. and 10d. This figure does not seem very large in these days, but an examination of the estates settled about the year 1700 will show that our emigrant ancestor was, by comparison, wealthy. Among the interesting things mentioned in the inventory are the following:

Wearing Apparel—Woolen and linen……………
£23, 4s, 6d.
A negro man (from the West Indies probably)
£45
A negro woman
£30
A cupboard with drawers………………………..
£2, 5s.



64 OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR

A great table, 12s. Six leather chairs, 24s. Six other chairs
£1, 4s. 2 chairs, 8s. (Note the leather chairs, and the number of chairs fo rthose days) 2 pictures, 10s. A greate ollking Glass, £1. Ivory headed cane, 6s. Silver headed cane, 12s. Looking glass, 6s. 82 lbs. Of ginger, £1,6s. A chest, 4s Iron beds and furniture (value not given.) 20 lbs. Tobacco, 6s.,8d. A quilt, £2, 10s. ($10.00) 3 forks, 2s. Spoons. A tablecloth, 1s,6d. Napkins,6s. Tablecloth, 11s. More napkins, £1, 16s. Towels, 5s A great Bible, £3, More books, £1,10s. A chest with drawers, £3. A desk, 4s. Candlestick 7s.6d. Chairs, 16s. Table, 5s. A silver cup, £2, 10s.

The inventory of the estate of William’s brother John, taken in 1676 also contains articles of interest. We mention two:
7 alcumy spoons, 2s 1 payre of gloves, 3s.

In the early days very few people had spoons, and we can form some idea of how much they were thought of from the following extract from Alice Morse Earle’s “China Collecting in America,” p. 43. She mentions how few people possessed spoons, and goes on to say, “Extremely elegant people had spoons of alchymy or occomy, alcaney, alcamy, acoury, askamy, accamey, as I have seen it spelt, a metal composed of pan brass and arsenicum.
Invantory of William (2) Maltby, Jr. estate mentions one or two interesting things, namely:

Hatt……………………………….
£1, 13s.
Books…………………………….. 4s.
A chest of drawers………………….6, 10s, 30d.
Seven pair of sheets………………..15,
2 pair sheets…………………………4,
Man Servant………………………..16,
Negro Boy………………………….20,

The will of William Maltby, Senior, and the inventory of his estate shows him to have been quite a



OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR 65

large land-owner—some of the lands mentioned are the following: “First, I give and bequeath unto my oldest sonn John Maltby all that house and land which I bought for him at Saybrook; being all the lands I have ther with the appurtenances thereof, of which sd house and land my sd sonn now stands seized and possessed—also I give and bequeath unto him my sd. sonn John Maltby my allotment of land which I bought of Capt. Merriman and Thomas Hall in quantity about one hundred acres lying between the bounds of Wallingford and Middletown and an equal share with the rest of my children in my commons and undivided land within the town of Branford,” etc. “Also I give and confirm unto my sd. grandson William Maltby sixty-four acres of land at that place called Tibbs Hill in the third division in Branford aforesaid with the addition northward adjoining those unto which all parcel of land with the appurtenances thereof,” etc. “I give and bequeath unto my loving son Daniel Maltby all that house and lands that he now stands in possession of in the town of Branford, the homlott being in quantity ten acres be it more or less, also all my land at Mulliner’s Neck and my divition there also. I further give my sd. son Daniel all my land on Bushy Plaine, containing thirteen acres be it more or less, all which land and appurtenances my will is shall be and remain to him,” etc. “I give and bequeath unto my loving son Samuell Maltby my orchard that lieth eastward of my now dwelling house in Branford from the street to the salt meadow,” etc. “I give and bequeath unto my loving son Jonathan Maltby my




66 OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR

mansion house I now dwell in within the precinct of Branford afores’d with the homlott of land thereto adjoining and belonging together with all housing, buildings, edifices and appurtenances thereunto belonging,” etc.
Item: “I give unto my daughter Jane Parker the bed, bedstead hangings and furniture thereof in my hall which were her mothers’s.”

(Note the “which WERE her mother’s”—referring to his first wife—as Abigail Bishop, born 1659, married John Talmadge in 1686 it is evident that John 1, Jane 2, Mary 3, William 4, Elizabeth 5 and Daniel 6 were children of a first wife.)

I give and bequeath to my aforesaid sons John Maltby and Daniel Maltby the remainder of my fourth division lotts beyond Tibb’s Hill,” etc.
The inventory of his estate mentions:


“15 acres of land at Scotch Cap.
About 8 acres of salt meadow at the same plact.
About 12 acres of rough land at Scotch Cap.
9 acres of land at Great Plaine.
5 acres of land at Indian Neck.
3 1/2 acres of land at Point Lotte.
2 acres of meadow at Indian Neck.
¾ acre of meadow.
3 acres of Salt meadow at PetersBridge.
A small parcel of fress meadow.
1 acre of Salt meadow in the mill quarter.
24 acres of land lying between the bounds of Wallingfordand Middletown.
76 acres of land at Sea Hill.
About 100 acres of land at Sibbes,
8 acres of land at CraverySwamp.


From the above records we can form some idea as to the prosperity of our emigrant ancestor.
A word as to the reasons for thinking that the first wife of William was Hannah---------




OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR 67

The BranfordChurchrecords, March 7, 1687-8has the following:


“IMBODIED IN CHURCH COVENANT---
Saml. Russell and women Eliz. Barker
Wm. Maltby Hannah Maltby
Eleazer Stone Sarah Blar
Saml. Pond ------Pond
John Frisbie Dorcas Taintor
John Taintor,”
etc., etc.


Saml. Russell was the minister, and had the first pew in the church in consequence. After the minister the eople of highest rank were seated. Why Eliz. Barker is named first among the women we do not know—there is a possibility that she was Hannah Maltby’s mother.
In 1682 we find a curious spelling of the name in the record, that, “Mr. William Mawbley and Noah Rogers are presented for freeman.”





The above sketch, will, we trust, give some idea of the life of William Maltby, “Esqre.,” who died in Branford, Conn., Sept. 1 1710, aged 65 years.


<A HREF="/maltby/2pg68.pdf">Old Maltby Homestead (Northford, Conn) 68





Old Maltby Homestead, Northford, Conn.



OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR 69

The old Maltby homestead shown in the photograph was the resident of John Maltby (5), born December 8, 1768. He was a son of Samuel 3d and Rosanna Coe—and descended from Samuel (2)—the photograph of whose tombstone appears on page 70.
This homestead is typical of the old New Englandhouses, now becoming so rare.
We are indebted to Miss Mary J. Maltby, of Northford, for this artistic photograph, as well as the one of Capt. Samuel’s (2) tombstone, and consider that we were particularly fortunate in securing this picture of the only old Maltby homestead left standing in Northford.

The homestead descended to Samuel Chauncey (6) Maltby who married Ruth Collins in 1819. The died in 1829, and his widow lived here alone after her husband’s death. The place used to be called “the Ruth Maltby place.” The homestead was afterwards sold to W. Tucker.

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg70.pdf">Tombstone of Capt. Samuel Maltbie 70

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg72.pdf">Some Maltbys in the World's Work 72

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg78.pdf">The English Research 78

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg81.pdf">Pedigree of Maltby of Maltby and Muston 81

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg89.pdf">Maltby Chapel (Poem) by Theodore Tilton 89

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg95.pdf">A Visit to Maltby, Yorkshire, by Martha J. Maltby (with Illurtrations) 95

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg109.pdf">English Maltby Pedigrees 109

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg113.pdf">Genealogical Queries 113

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg117.pdf">Roll of Members 117

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg133.pdf">First Annual Report (Republished) 133

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg137.pdf">Second Annual Report (Republished -with two illustrations) 137

<A HREF="/maltby/2pg148.pdf">Book Notices 148

Supplement containing ancient English Pedigree. In the membership roll (R.W.) stands for Revolutionary War; (1812) the War of 1812; (C.W.)the Civil War.

</PRE> </H3> </BODY> </html>


















PRESS OF

JAY H. MALTBY,

FORMAN, N. DAK.

1909





2


MALTBY BOOKLET NUMBER TWO



Contents


PAGE
Coat-of-Arms 4
Kinship (Poem) by Maude Townshend Maltby 5
Sketch of President (and Photograph) 8
Sketch of 1st Vice Photograph (and Photograph) 10
Gen. Isacc Maltby (Photograph) 12
Third Annual Report (with Illustrations) 13
In Memoriam 29
Biographies 39
Tombstones of Capt. Jonathan Maltbie and
Elizabeth, His Wife (Photograph) 49
Sketch of
Branford, Conn 52
Sketch of William Maltby, "Esqre." 55
Old Maltby Homestead (
Northford, Conn) 68
Tombstoneof Capt. Samuel Maltbie 70
Some Maltbys in the World's Work 72
The English Research 78
Pedigree of Maltby of Maltby and Muston 81
Maltby Chapel (Poem) by Theodore Tilton 89
A Visit to Maltby,
Yorkshire, by Martha J.
Maltby (with Illurtrations) 95





3


CONTENTSContinued.

English Maltby Pedigrees 109
Genealogical Queries 113
Roll of Members 117
First Annual Report (Republished) 133
Second Annual Report (Republished -with two
illustrations) 137
Book Notices 148
Supplement containing ancient English Pedigree.

















In the membership roll (R.W.) stands for Revolutionary

War; (1812) the War of 1812; (C.W.)the Civil War.





OUR PRESIDENT



OUR PRESIDENT
MR. GEORGE E. MALTBY, our President, is the second child of Lucius and Sarah J. Parks Maltby. He was born February 18th, 1830, in Pair Haven (now a part of New Haven,) Connecticut. As a boy Mr. Maltby lived at home, going to school and helping his father with the farm. Later he became clerk in Dr. Parker's drug store, being at the time eighteen years of age.
Three years later Mr. Maltby went into the drug business for himself. In May, 1852, he married Elizabeth Broughton Magnire. They had two children, Edward Parks, and Mary Louise, Maltby, Shortly after the above children were born the war broke out and Mr. Maltby disposed of his drug business and went South where for some time he supplied General Grant's army with provisions. Mr. Maltby established an oyster business in Norfolk, Virginia, and was the first to ship opened oysters in bulk to New York; for a long time averaging five hundred gallons a day.

In 1864 Mr. Maltby lost his wife and for seven years was a widower. In 1871 he married Ruth Atwater Bostwick, and to them were born Margaret Atwater, George Erastus and Lucius Upson, Maltby.
In 1878 Mr. Maltby and his family left Virginiaand went to New Yorkto live, where the northern branch of the oyster business was supervised by him. Mrs. Maltby died in May, 1898, and soon after Mr. Maltby gave up active business and now divides his time between his older daughter, Mrs. Frederick S. Smith of Chester, Connecticut, and his younger daughter, Mrs. William M. Bernard of New York City.



FIRST VICE PRESIDENT





11

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT




MR. WILLIAM HENRY MALTBIE, OUR 1st Vice President, professor of mathematics at the Woman's College of Baltimore, Maryland, was born in Toledo, Ohio, Aug. 26, 1867. Mr. Maltbie is a son of Silas Benjamin and Angie Van Deman Maltbie. He graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1890; A. M. 1892; fellow Johns Hopkins, 1894-5; Ph. D., same, 1895; married Dec. 19, 1904, Kate A. S. McCurley. Professor of Mathematics, Hedding College, Illinois, 1890-1; instr. Feb.-Sept. 1895; associate professor, 1895; professor, 1899, Woman's College of Baltimore. Member of Phi Beta Kappa, Am. Math. Soc. For address see Membership Roll. -- (Taken from "Who's Who in America, 1908-9.")








: The Maltby Association. :

OFFICERS
MR. GEORGE E. MALTBY, . . . . . . . . . . . . . President
MR. W. H. MALTBIE, . . . . . . . . . . . 1st Vice President
MRS. JOHN P. VICTORY, . . . . . . . . . 2d Vice President
MRS. JAMES WILLEY TODD, . . . . . . . . . . . . Treasurer
MRS. CLARENCE VERRILL, . . . . Secretary and Genealogist

The Third Annual Report

The end of January, nineteen hundred and nine marks the completion of the third year of life for the Maltby Association, and as we look back upon our beginning with its doubts and fears, its struggles and trials, then glance at our present membership roll, should we not all feel just a bit pleased with the result of our labors?
In view of the increased membership it seems not unfitting that a few words should appear in Booklet Two which would give members, especially the new members, some slight idea of our history and our work; how we came to exist, and so on.
In February, nineteen hundred and six, two or three of the Maltby cousins were brought to face with these questions--Who was going to care for the tombstones of the early ancestors? Who- was going to preserve the family records? What was to become of the few old relics and Maltby homesteads? Were no photographs to be taken, that these might be preserved to posterity? and many similar queries. The result of all this was that those few undertook to interest other cousins, and to form a Maltby Association--bound together through the tie of blood, to accomplish these several things.







Treasurer





14
SECRETARY'S REPORT


There were twenty-seven original members—all joining during February and March of 1906.
At the end of the year our number had grown to forty, and having practiced the strictest economy and contributed from private sources we found we had $34.80 in the Treasury. Certainly not enough to warrant any expenditure, though there were the annual reports to be got out. It was through the kindness of our Treasurer, Mrs. Todd, that these were furnished with no expense to the Association.
The work of the second year is fully shown in Booklet No.1. We closed the year with 59 members and $66.22 in the Treasury. Again the question of getting out the reports was perplexing us and again were these furnished privately. This time by Mr. Jay Hayes Maltby, editor of the Forman News, of Forman, North Dakota. Booklet No. 1 received so much praise from the members that any words here would be superfluous. What these booklets did for the Association is best shown by the large increase in membership. We find ourselves at the close of this third year with about one hundred members, and $74.77 in the Treasury.
Our membership roll includes 108 names, but there are sever members in the list who have not as yet paid their dues for 1908. Some of these, we think, have simply neglected to pay, and some very likely may wish to resign.

We do not wish to urge members to remain in the Association, and yet we dislike to lose any of the cousins. It would be a great convenience if members wishing to resign would formally notify the secretary







to this effort, and thus simplify making out the reports.
There are also eight members who joined the Association in January, and there has not been time as yet to hear from them since they were notified as to their dues. One member paid this year’s dues last year, and two members do not pay, having furnished work gratis, which otherwise would have cost the Association in the neighborhood of fifty dollars. The officers felt that the least return was to extend honorary membership to them.


Treasure’s Report.

Balance on hand Feb. 1, 1908, - - - - - $66.22

Received three belated dues (1907-8) - - -- 3.00
Received in dues to Feb. 1, 1909


Balance on hand Feb. 1, 1909, - - - $ 74.77

YEAR’S EXPENSES -----1908

Postage ……………………………………….$ 20.14

Envelopes ……………………………………. .55
Typewriting Paper …………………………… .75
Letter-Heads (500) …………………………… 4.50
Printed Receipt Cards ………………….……… 1.75
Circular Letters (200) ………………….……… 1.10
English Photographs …………………………. .50
Query in “I.G.D.” …………………….……….. 1.21
Vicar of E. Retford’s fee ………………….…… 2.75
Check for Mr. Fothergill ……………………… 48.70
Fee for same …………………………………. .50
----------


Total spent to Feb. 1, 1909 ………….…….. $ 82.45




18 SECRETARY’S REPORT


Death has taken several of our kindred from us and the loss is indeed great, not only to those closely related, but to those who, through letters, had grown to feel a strong personal friendship as well as the blood tie.
Booklet No. 2 we owe to Mr. Jay Hayes Maltby, who has spared neither time nor money to make it attractive and interesting. The expense of such a booklet is large and with the hope that he might cover the actual expense of printing and so forth, we have asked fifty cents a copy for them. The booklet will be the same price to non-members as to the members of the Association.
It is the hope of the officers that the day may come when the Association is entirely self-supporting, but first we shall have to increase our membership. Concerning this, we should like to make an appeal to the members: Are you interested enough in the Association to try and bring some relative into it? It sounds very like the proposition of one’s Sunday school days, yet, what a help if each member could interest only one person. Will you not try to help us to this extent?
In gathering material for the Booklet, we have endeavored to procure some photographs which would interest all the descendants.
The views of Maltby, England, and the interesting sketch of a Day at Maltby, by Miss Martha J. Maltby, as well as the reproduction of the Maltby coat-of-arms should interest any of the Maltby name or blood.
We frequently receive letters asking “Is a member of our branch of the family, and if so, how related?”




SECRETARY’S REPORT 19

It is rather a delicate matter to touch upon, but some of the Maltbys have deservedly, made for themselves considerable reputation, and the “lay brothers” who are not so fortunate are justly proud of those who have pushed on in the World’s Work. Endeavoring to secure photographs and some sketches, which we know will be interesting to members. We also wish to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to those who for “the sake of kinship were willing to help us in this way.
In Booklet No. 2 we reproduced a photograph of Rev. Jonathan Maltby, who, so far as we know, was the first person to preserve the family records. His work was amplified by his niece Martha Church Maltby, daughter of Gen. Isaac Maltby (4), who married Harlow Swain Love. One could hardly state that Mrs. Love was the next person to take up this genealogical work, as Deacon Charles Foote (a descendant of Samuel [2] Maltby) who was one year Mrs. Love’s senior in age, also labored long and painstakingly to gather the family records and preserve them. His efforts are included in “The Maltby-Morehouse Family.” To all of these three we owe much of the early records of the Maltbys. They gave their best efforts to this work; examined records, tombstones, wrote countless letters, met with very little help and considerable hindrance—this is the story of nearly all genealogist—but they did their best against many drawbacks, and their best was good. If there were mistakes, and there were and









SECRETARY’S REPORT 21

always will be in this sort of work, can we not overlook these, and simply be grateful for the vast amount of data left us.
The present genealogist finds the work progressing always, but far from rapidly. In a way this is unavoidable. Getting records together is a real trial for some people; others have not the time; others mean well, but do not know how to go about it—and lastly there are the “not interested.” The latter can block a whole branch of the family from having their records appear in the genealogy, and the genealogist learns that it is useless to expect any reply from them.
The most important work of the year in the American branch was the placing, after years of hard search of Noah Maltby (5) of New Yorkstate. We owe the solving of this mystery to Miss Ethel Lord Scofield of West Haven, Conn., (a professional genealogist) who through some extremely clever work proved the ancestry of Noah Maltby (5) back to William (1) the Emigrant. The ancestry of the Vershire, Vermont. Maltbys was also straightened out, with the aid of Miss Scofield, making on the whole, a very satisfactory progress with the genealogy.
We also got trace of the descendants of the emigrant John Maltby, brother of William; and it gives us pleasure to have one of them, Mr. Maltby Gelston Leach, on our roll of members. John Maltby, the emigrant, is supposed to have been lost at sea about the year 1677. He married about 1671, Mary, daughter of Richard Bryan of Milford, Conn. They had two children, twins, John and Mary, born at New Haven, Conn., June 1, 1673.







SECRETARY’S REPORT 23

John Maltby Jr., married Susannah Clark. He was of Southampton, Long Island, and he died there June 27, 1706. (The Association endeavored to secure a photograph of this tombstone, but we fear it will be too late to be included in this report.) John (2) had only one child who married; this was Mary (3) who became the wife of Judge Hugh Gelston. (Note here the Maltby name dies out in the line of John Maltby, the emigrant.) Hugh (4) Gelston was their thenth child, and his only child was the Rev. Maltby (5) Gelston, whose picture we have reproduced on another page. Rev. Maltby Gelston was born July 17, 1766, and was ordained April 26, 1797. For forty-five years he was settled in the ministry at Sherman, Conn., where he died December 15, 1856, aged 90 years.
We have been fortunate in securing photographs of the old homestead of Rev. Maltby Gelston, his desk, flintlock gun, and study chair. Mr. Maltby Gelston Leach is a great grandson of Rev. Maltby Gelston.
In the second annual report we mentioned that William (1) evidently had a daughter named Martha (2) and quoted Rev. Jonathan Maltby as our authority. Since the report was issued we have had some investigations made of the records at Branford, New Havenand Wallingford. The records are very puzzling and seemingly contradictory and at this date it is not possible to say whether William Maltby did, or did not have a daughter named Martha.
Recently it was called to our attention that the tombstones of William Maltby, emigrant ancestor,








The above is a reproduction of the house in which Rev. Maltby Gelston lived at ShermanConn. A number of his grand-children are in the foreground.






The picture on the side shows a desk and chair a hundred years old, and a flintlock gun, used by the Rev. Maltby Gelston.







26 SECRETARY’S REPORT

and of his second wife, Abigail Bishop Maltby, do not how stand in the same place in the Branford cemetery as they did in 1894; and also Mrs. Maltby’s stone no longer stands beside her husband’s but at its foot. This is very much to be regretted, and the Secretary wrote to the Pastor of the First Congregational Church to ascertain where to apply for information on the subject. The Pastor sent the address of the Sexton, and a letter was written asking for estimates for replacing the stones side by side, and also asking if the stones could be restored to their original place in the cemetery. This last, we fear, is hopeless, but in the spring the stones can be placed in their former position, even if not on the original graves.

It is with deepest regret that we have to record the deths of three of our members: Mr. George W. Maltby, Mr. Silas Benjamin Maltbie and Deacon William Maltby. To the bereaved families the Assocaiation wishes to tender its sincere sympathy.
The short biographical sketches following this report will give our members a little insight into the lives of these cousins, bring us all into closer touch, and strengthen the tie of kinship.
A word as to the proposed reunion in Branford on Sept. 1, 1910—two hundred years from the date of death of William Maltby.
We are so widely scattered that many of us can not be present at such a reunion, yet ther are many descendants who could visit Branford on this date, and to these the following words are addressed:
It is hoped that all the descendants of William Maltby residing within a short distance of New Haven





SECRETARY’S REPORT 27

will try to visit the grave of William Maltby on the date above given. It is too early to form definite arrangements for the reunion, but the following is a rough plan:

The ten o’clocktrolley car from the New Havengreen would allow one to arrive tin Branford shortly before eleven. The ride is a very pretty one, and the fare was, in 1906, fifteen cents; it may have been reduced since. The town hall is open till noon, and here are to be found the early records, with the various deeds, etc., signed by William Maltby, town clerk. In back of the court house is the old academy building, and beyond that the bronze tablet marking the spot where stood the house of the Rev. Samuel Russell, in which YaleCollegewas founded. The cemetery is hardly more that a city square from where the cars stop, and here lies the body of William Maltby, and Abigail, his wife, and descendants could bring flowers with which to decorate the craves.
From the cemetery, the trolley could again be taken down to Indian Neck (fare five cents, we believe) where lunch could be procured. The Montowese House is a very good summer hotel, and here one could get a very desirable lunch; or basket lunches could be taken with one, as there are various pleasant places along the shore where picnic lunches could be eaten. After lunch there would be time for the descendants to meet socially, and also to hold some sort of exercises suitable for the occasion.




SECRETARY’S REPORT 28

The Association would undertake to arrange all details for those who desired to go as one united family; and to those who wished to go in small parties, would gladly furnish any information required.
It must be understood that the reunion is not simply for members of the Maltby Association, but for Maltby descendants and their families.
The Secretary requests letters from members in regard to this reunion with suggestions as to the day’s programme. The Secretary also desires that additions and corrections be sent in, whenever mistakes are found, ether in the Booklet of the genealogy.
The Association intended to secure photographs of all their offices for Booklet No. 2, but owing to illness it was impossible to obtain a picture of our second Vice President, Mrs. John P. Victory. We hope that the next booklet will contain a photograph of Mr. Victory, who has worked long and untiringly for the Association.
We trust that all members will continue to take an interest in the Association and its work, and that their interest may increase as time goes on. May this interest prompt members to send the Secretary photographs of any old Maltby homesteads, portraits, relics, tombstones, etc,, and copies of interesting documents. Only in this way can we preserve these things to posterity.
The Association thanks the members for their kind support and encouragement, and wishes each cousin a happy New Year.
DOROTHY MALTBY VERRILL,
(Mrs. Clarence Verrill,)
Feb. 1st. 1909. Secretary.



IN MEMORIAM






IN MEMORIAM 31

GEORGE W. MALTBY
------

The following obituary is taken from the “Buffalo Evening News.” Of July 1. 1908:
“BUSINESS MAN OF NATIONAL FAME PASSES AWAY.
------

GEORGE W. MALTBY DIED THIS MORNING AT HIS HOME IN THIS CITY.
“He was one of the old type of business men with whom if you had a contract; you wouldn’t need to put it in writing,” was the remark evoked from a prominent business man by the announcement of the death of George W. Maltby at his home at 3:30 o’clockthis morning. Among the tributes to his memory by legions of friends, no encomium will ring truer than this. But it is conceded by all who knew him that business honesty was only an incidental characteristic and one that was regarded as a matter of course by Mr. Maltby. That was the rough stone of his character—“square-hewn and polished for a grand and sterling character.” * * * Mr. Maltby was born in West Henrietta, Monroecounty. N.Y., in 1845. When not seventeen he enlisted as a private in Company H. of the 108th New York Volunteer Infantry and served with Gen. Winfield Scott at Antietam, Gettysbury and Spottsylvania Court House.
He was all day on the battlefield of Antietam, “the bloodiest day of the whole war,” and though wounded he struck to his regiment. At Gettysbury he was hit by splinters of a shell, and in the death carnival at Spottsylvania, his left hand was so shattered by a




IN MEMORIAM 32

bullet he could no longer carry a musket. This injury disabled him from active service and he was confined in the SatterleeMilitaryHospitalat Philadelphiauntil his discharge in November, 1864. For months he ministered with his one hand to his sick and dying comrades in the long wards of SatterleeHospital, finally becoming head nurse.
Returning from the army, 19 years old at this time, Mr. Maltby decided to continue his studies, and took a course in a business college at Rochester. In 1865 he entered the firm of Whitmore, Corson & Co., Rochester, dealers in cut stone. In 1880 Mr. Maltby came to Buffalo, entering partnership with Gilbert Brady of Rochester, under the name Brady and Maltby. The partnership was continued until the death of Mr. Brady in 1896. Mr. Maltby was in business alone until 1904, when he took his two sons, James C. and William Maltby into partnership, under the name of George W. Maltby and Sons.
Memorials of Mr. Maltby’s life work exist in monuments of cut stone all over the courtry. He furnished and dressed the stone for the McKinley Momument in Niagara Square, also for the McKinley National Memorial at Canton, including the interion work and sarcophagus; the Historical Society’s Building; the Albright Art Gallery; the bridge over Park Lake, Gate’s Circle, the entrance of Forest Lawn, the First Presbyterian Church, the new addition to the Buffalo Club and the Ontorio Power Company’s building at Niagara Falls
Mr. Maltby was a member of Bidwell-Wilkeson Post, G. A. R., the Union Veteran Legion, and Queen City Lodge. F. & A. M. He was a trustee of the






IN MEMORIAM 33

Blocher Home, former president of the Builder’s Exchange and a member of the Chamber of Commerce. He was also a member of the Plymount M. E. Church.
On Aug. 27, 1865, Mr. Maltby married Miss Mary J. Pierce, daughter of Caleb Pierce of Rochester. His widow, a daughter, Mrs. D. J. Perry, and two sons, James C. and William C. Maltby, survive him.

(The above extracts are taken from the Christian Advocate as well as from the Buffalo Evening News.)








SILAS BENJAMIN MALTBIE,
Mr. Silas B. Maltbie, of Baltimore, was the oldest child of Harrison and Susanah Darling Maltbie, and was born Sept. 4, 1835. In 1864 he married Angie Van Deman. Their only child is Mr. W. H. Maltbie our first Vice President. Mr. Silas B. Maltbie died Nov. 7, 1908, of arterial sclerosis, aged 73 years.







IN MEMORIAM 35



DEACON WILLIAM MALTBY.


Deacon William Maltby, of Horthford, Conn., was the first child of Henry and Ruth Hart Maltby, and was born March 19th, 1825. He married Esther Hall, daughter of Dr. Pierce and Ester Hall, Hall of Wallingford.

The following is a short extract from a sketch of Mr. Maltby’s life, which appeared in a local paper at the time of his death:

“In the death of Deacon William Maltby, the town loses one of its oldest and best citizens. In his younger days, he was a school-teacher and taught school in Wallingfordand other towns. Later, he settled on the farm. He represented his town in the state legislature in 1881. He was a member of the school board for thirty-five years, and for over forty years was a deacon in the Congregational church.”

Deacon Maltby was a descendant of Samuel (2) whose tombstone is shown on another page. Deacon Maltby died May 31, 1908, age 83 years. He is survived by his widow, and two daughters.











Deaths of Members.


1. MRS. RICHARD LONG. Died January 3, 1906, aged 32 years.

2. MR. GEORGE W. MALTBY. Died July 1, 1908, aged 63 years.

3. MR. HENRY E. MALTBY. Died ----1906, aged 49 years.

4. MR. OLIVER ELLSWORTH MALTBY. Died October, 1907, aged 80 years.

5. MR. SILAS BENJAMIN MALTBIE. Died Nov. 7, 1908, age 73 years.

6. DEACON WILLIAM MALTBY. Died May 31, 1908, aged 83 years.

7. MRS. JUSTIN W. MEACHAM. Died Sept. 12, 1907, aged 64 years.




















BIOGRAPHICAL















For the following sketch of Rev. Maltbie Babcock, we are indebted to his aunt. Mrs. Armstrong Maltbie (Annie C. Maltbie.)










BIOGRAPHICAL 39

Maltbie Davenport Babcock

Rev. Maltbie Davenport Babcock, D.D., was born at Syracuse, N. Y.., August 3d, 1858. He was the eldest son of Henry Babcock and Emily Maria Maltbie. Her father was the Rev. Ebenezer Davenport Maltbie, son of Davie Maltbie and Nancy Davenport of Stamford, Conn., who was the lineal descendant of Rev. John Davenport of New Haven, Conn. Emily Maria Maltbie’s mother was Mary Ann Davis, daughter of Rev. Henry Davis D. D., and Hannah Phoenix Tredwell.
There were many generations of the most prominent, refined and cultivated men and women behind Dr. Bobcock and he went forth to his life work from an ideal home. His maternal great grandfather and his grandfather were both Presbyterian clergymen. He was the eldest of seven children, and his mother’s widespread religious influence, and her beautiful life still speak in many of the influential circles of his native city. Here he was educated, taking his classical course at SyracuseUniversity, and his theological course at Auburn Seminary. In both of these institutions he won highest honors and hosts of friends.
Dr. Babcock received immediate recognition in the front rank of his denomination, his first settlement being at Lockport, N. Y. It was not only his brilliant intellent and his stirring oratorical powers that commanded admiration, for his ministry was ideal and no pastor in the land was more beloved. The man was everywhere regarded as a personal friend,




BIOGRAPHICAL 40

so cordial, so frank, so cheerful was he always, and so thoroughly unselfish. His influence became in the best sense national. His theology was like his vocal delivery, simple and direct. It was one soul speaking to another. His prayers voiced the cry of a man who wanted help from his FATHER. Dr. Babcock could not do anything just as anyone else would. “To divide burdens and centralize responsibility is the ark of accomplishment;” this was his rule in doing his varied work, and it gave him his almost supreme executive ability. Perhaps there was no greater tribute to his power and consecration than the fact that he was invariably turned to, as a sort of last resort in the attempt to bring a wandering soul to CHRIST. Often men said: “Let us get him under Dr. Babcock’s influence; he can surely reach him.” Dr. Babcock was a very versatile man; exceedingly attractive in physique, pleasant in manner, with a soul that reflected GOD.
Dr. Babcock was a clear thinker, and a fluent speaker. He was noted for his broad and impartial charity, and his vast array of friends among the young men of his country. He reached the people in so many ways. His personal magnetism was marvelous. Those who heard him were entranced and he was called to speak at all great religious gatherings, from one end of the country to the other and crowds, young and old, hung upon his lips. Taught of the SPIRIT, he revealed to them the open heaven and the message of JEHOVAH.
Dr. Babcock never published a book. He lived or sang his thoughts. He was a great lover of music, played many instruments extremely well, improvised delightfully and also wrote many songs and hymns which have been published and have won instant recognition as splendid work. But the watchword of his life was: “This one thing I do;” to honor his MASTER and to save souls. His poems are of unquestioned excellence and have been said to resemble those of Emerson. They have been published in connection with a memorial volume of extracts from sermons and addresses, gathered by his grief stricken widow, entitled “Thoughts for Every Day Living.” His foreigh letters, written while last abroad; to the men of the BrickChurchin New York Citywere also published.
What Dr. Babcock’s work was in Baltimoreit is simply impossible to extimate in an article as brief as this or to speak of the breadth and reach of that wonderful pastorate in New York. His acquaintance was cosmopolitan; and it knew no denominational bond, and was met by a distinguished hospitality to which his wife, the daughter of a prominent Poughkeepsielawyer, added both beauty and charm. What Dr. Babcock was in his home only those who lived with him and loved him, upon whom his devotion was showered can tell. At the time of his death, at Naples, Italy, May 18, 1901, in his forty-third year, the papers both religious and secular teemed with statements proving in every way his remarkable power.
One who knew Dr. Babcock intimately said: “The only relief in the mystery of his untimely death it seemed to me, was in the fact that his character and work were of such POTENCY that they must reproduce themselves in the living.



For this sketch of Mrs. Harlow Swain Love (Martha Church Maltby) we are indebted to her daughter, Mrs. Frederick E. Foster. Mrs. Love was a daughter of General Isaac Maltby, whose portrait appears on page 12.


1 2 3 4
William Daniel Benjamin Isaac

Martha Church Maltby
(MRS. HARLOW SWAIN LOVE)

Was the youngest of the ten children of Gen. Isaac Maltby and Lucinda Murray, his wife, who was the daughter of Gen. Seth Murray, an officer during the entire war of the Revolution, and who participated in all of the early engagements and was present at the Battle of Bennington, and also at the surrender of Burgoyne. She was borne in Hatfield, Mass. Her parents removed to Waterloo, N. Y., when she was but two years of age, and upon her marriage to Mr. Harlow S. Love, their home was established in Buffalo, N. Y., where all of her five children were born. Prior to 1860 the family made several trips to California by the way of Panama, and in that year they located permanently n San Francisco, where Mr. Love, until his death in 1866, was a prominent member of the legal profession, and where, later, her son John became the Attorney General of the state of California and subsequently the City and County Attorney of San Francisco.
Mrs. Love was a person of great intellectuality, refinement and cultivation, and of a lovely and graceful presence. She was endowed I an eminent degree with all those tender attributes which endear a woman to the circle of her familiar friends, and possessed that gentleness and benevolence of character which purifies and softens the social atmosphere of her surroundings. To these qualities were united an unostentatious charity and helpfulness which all of her intimates have reason to remember with affectionate gratitude. Her literary attainments were of a high order; and for many years she contributed to the public prints articles on various subjects, which were widely read and favorably received. She also devoted much labor and attention to genealogical research, and was instrumental in tracing and rescuing from oblivion the lines of her descent from Colonial and Revolutionary ancestors, all of whom were of distinguished stock.
Mrs. Love crossed the Pacific Ocean numerous times, visiting Hong Kong, China, on the occasion of the marriage of her daughter Leila to William Hammond Foster, Jr., (a member of the celebrated Americad house of Russell & Co., Caina,) and some years later making her home with her youngest daughter Martha, the wife of Frederick E. Foster, successively in Yokohama, Japan, and Hong Kong, China, where Mr. Foster represented, as General Agent, the trans-Pacific lines of steamers plying between those ports and San Francisco. Mrs. Love and her husband are interred in Lone Mountain Cemetery, San Francisco, California, and are survived (in 1908) only by their daughter Martha (Mrs. F. E. Foster) now residing in Mount Vernon. N. Y.
The following condensed biography of Gen. Isaac Maltby (4), whose portrait appears on page 12, was very kindly furnished the Association by Mrs. Frederic Emory Foster, his grand-daughter.
Major Seth Murray Maltby referred to in the sketch was the father of Mr. George Beecher Maltby and Mrs. A. T. Higby whose names will be found in the roll of members.



Gen. Isaac Maltby
Born November 10, 1767; graduated at YaleCollege1786. He was the son of Benjamin Maltby of Northford and Branford, Conn., and Elizabeth Fowler, his wife. He was a student of divinity with Dr. Smalley of New Britain, Conn., and was admitted to the church in that place July 12, 1789, and licensed to preach the same year, by New Haven, East. He married Nov. 10, 1790, at Hatfield, Mass., Lucinda Murray, the only child of Seth Murray, who was a Brigadier General in the Hampshire Militia in the time of the Revolutionary War, and he was persuaded to settle with his father-in-law in Hatfield. He served as representative from Hatfield in the Massachusetts Legislature 1809-10; was the author of three books on Military Science, viz: “Elements of War,” “Military Tactics” and “Court Martial;” twice chosen Presidential Elector at a period in American history when the Electoral College was composed of notable men and when it was intended to select deliberately the President of the United States. He served through the war of 1812 and was made Brigadier General in 1813, with headquarters at Boston, his son Seth Murray Maltby being paymaster in the same brigade with the rank of major. In 1818 he removed to Waterloo, Seneca county, N. Y. where he died the following year (1819.)



BIOGRAPHICAL 47

Capt. Jonathan Maltbie 3d

Through the kindness of Miss Emily A. Lynes of Norwalk, Conn., we have secured a photograph of the tombstone of Capt. Jonathan Maltbie of Revolutionary War fame. The stone of his wife Elizabeth (Allen) Maltbie will be seen beside his.
Miss Lones endeavored to obtain a photograph of Capt. Jonathan Maltby’s commission, signed by General Washington, and also one of Capt. Maltbie’s old homestead in Fairfield, Conn. We regret not being able to print them in Booklet Two but hope to do so later.
The sketch of Jonathan Maltbie, 3d, written by Miss Lynes, will be found intensely interesting by all the members, we feel sure.

“My great grandfather, Jonathan Maltbie, 3d, the picture of whose grave accompanies this sketch, was the only child of Jonathan Jr. and Abigail Holmes Maltbie, born at Stamford, Conn., December 17, 1744. He moved to Fairfield, Conn., and married Elizabeth the daughter of David and Sarah (Gold) Allen Oct. 23d, 1768. He was a sea captain in the East Indiatrade, and lived in one of the historical houses given in the “History of Fairfield Count” as “Colonial No.4.” This house was built in 1766 by Isaac Tucker, who sold it to Captain Maltbie who owned and occupied it during Revolutionary times, and was one of the few house left standing at the burning of Fairfield. Mr. Henry Rowland, a grandson, in writing some reminiscences, states that “grandfather




48 BIOGRAPHICAL

Maltbie’s (house) was reserved for a cook house. After the conflagration the inhabitants returned (when the British had gone on board their ships.) Grandfather Maltbie on returning to his house found all their valuable china scooped off the shelves on to the floor and broken into pieces and everything upside down. In the kitchen in the fireplace hung a large brass kettle filled with their hams, but they dare not eat them, fearing that they were poisoned, (so they started anew with provisions.)” Captain Maltbie’s son William inherited this place and sold it to Justin Hobart. The house is still standing today in good condition. Jonathan Maltbie was 1st Lieutenant of the “Trumbull,” one of the first cruisers built for the Continental navy; Dadley Saltonstall, Commander. She went into service about April, 1780, carrying 28 guns and her crew numbered 200. Her first engagement under Captain Nicholson, occurred June 2d of the same year; with the “Watt,” an English letter-of-marque, under Captain Colehart. She carried 34 guns and 250 men. The “Watt,” a private vessel with a cargo of great value, and was especially equipped to fight her way. This was the first action of any moment that occurred in 1780 and had the reputation of being the most obstinate and sanguinary naval battle during the Revolution. The “Trumbull” being badly disabled failed to capture the “Watt,” although she defeated her. The next summer, 1781, she left the Delaware, still under Captain Nicholson, having been thoroughly equipped as convoy to 28 sail of merchant craft bound for CapeFrancois, West Indies. Off the capes the “Trumbull” met three British cruisers astern. Two of them, on being a frigate, stood for the “Trumbull”—




48 BIOGRAPHICAL

which ship by hauling up gained the wind of them. While standing on in this manner, hoping everything from the darkness, which was fast approaching, a gale carried away the ‘Trumbull’s” fore top mast, which, in falling, brought down the main gallant mast. She was otherwise disabled and night coming on was unable to clear up the wreck. At 10 o’clockthe Iris, 32 guns, one of the vessels in chase, closed with her and forced her to combat. In the midst of rain and tempestuous winds Captain Nicholson found himself obliged to go to quarters or to strike, without resistance. He preferred to do the first, but the English volunteers on board his ship, instead of obeying orders, went below, extinguished lights and secreted themselves. Near half the remaining men followed their example and Captain Nicholson could not muster fifty of even the diminished crew he had at the guns. The battle that followed might almost be said to have been fought by the officers. These brave men sustained by a party of the petty officers and seamen managed a few of the guns for more than an hour, when the “General Monk” 18 guns, coming up and joining in the fire of the “Iris,” the “Trumbull” submitted. The “Trumbull,” after her capture, was towed into New Yorkharbor and condemned. Though unsuccessful in her battles, she still fought two of the most famous fights that took place on the ocean during the exciting times of the Revolution. Jonathan Maltby was afterwards appointed Master of the “Argus,’ a cutter in the service of the United Statesfor the protection of the revenue. He died Feb. 11th, 1798, while in command of this vessel, and was buried in




BIOGRAPHICAL 51

the old cemetery at Fairfield, Conn. The date of Jonathan Maltbie’s commission as 1st Lieutenant—Oct. 12th, 1776. Date of commissioin as Captain by George Washington—March 21st, 1791. These commissions were in the family of his son William who lived in the South, and were said to have been given to some Historical Society.”




52 MALTBY BOOKLET NO. TWO

Sketch of Branford, Connecticut.
Many of the descendants have expressed a wish to known something about Branford of the early days, and the following sketch, taken from an essay written by Miss Olive Hall pond of Branford, gives us a very good idea of the Branford our early ancestors knew.
“At first, the chief occupation was farming, but the people soon found the land was not remarkable for its fertility. Branford harbor was then much deeper than it is at the present time, and furnished excellent facilities for ships engaging in trade with the West Indies. Consequently, merchandise from foreign ports was brought to Branford and was then carried over the hills to New Haven, which at the time did not have a good harbor.
Trading necessitated the building of ships. Vessels suitable to transport merchandise to all parts of the world were built where the swimming pool at Mill Plain is now located,’ etc.
“It is interesting to picture the town as we find it in the year 1700” 9ten years prior to the death of William Maltby,) “The green was then, as now, the center of the town. Large rocks, boulders, and tall grass completely covered it.
There was but one church, which stood where the town hall does today. This was called the new meeting house, the first having been built on the site of the cemetery and surrounded by a high stockade, as a protection from hostile Indians.




A SKETCH OF BRANFORD 53

Scattered around the green were the “Sabbath Day Houses.” They were used by families who came from a long distance. They afforded the people places to rest and warm themselves during the noonhour, for the church services there lasted nearly all day.
Two other conspicuous structures on the green were the blacksmith shop and the whipping post. The shop stood in the hollow back of the church, the whipping post and public stocks on the hill where the Baptist church now stands.
There were but few public highways, the chief of which led from New Haventhrough the town of Branfordto Guilford. Mantowese street, named from the Indians, ran as now from the center to the river. Here it turned, following the present course of the railroad, thence back to the green. A streetupon which the minister and several officials of the town lived, led from Montowese street, east to the river, womewhat similar to Averill avenue. This was called “Pig Lane.”
The first post-office with public store combined, stood on the site of the Lock works. This hollow formed the principal business section of Branford.
The kindergarten, grammar and high school combined, consisted of one building, the academy, which now stands, the only remaining relic of former days.
It is most amusing to notice some of the customs and restrictions of that time. Chief among these were the church laws. Sunday morning a drum was beaten to call the members to church. Every person who did not attend, arrive on time, and stay until the service was over, was heavily fined. Besides this




54 A SKETCH OF BRANFORD

a man was hired to go among the gongregation, during the service and prevent them from going to sleep. This he accomplished by means of a long pole. Any weary mortal who chanced to close his eves for a moment’s rest would receive a vigorous poke of the pole, with a command to wake up and listen to the words of the Gospel.
On this day the green was transformed into a lively scene. The farmers and their entire families drove into town in their large open wagons; one man coming all the way from Northford, regularly attended with his wife and 26 children.
Another law of special importance, the fines for the violation of which would make Branford of today very wealthy, if the law were enforced, was what was known in Englandas the curfew law. This stated that the streets must be vacated, fires banked and every man in his home at 10 o’clock.”


The above interesting sketch of Miss Pond’s gives one a very good idea of the town of Branfordin the early days—the town as it was shen the home of our emigrant ancestor, William Maltby.




55

WILLIAM MALTBY, ESQ.
----------
1645---1710



Our Enigrant Ancestor.
In the year 1645, as we learn from his tombstone * our emigrant ancestor, William Maltby, was born. Where he was born, and who were his parents is not as yet known, though recent searches in Englandgive us strong clues towards answering these questions. What these clues are will be found in another part of this booklet. We know but little of his family. He had a brother John, probably older, who emigrated to New Englandwith him. There was a near relative named Robert Maltbye, as a deed of land of William’s is dated Branford, April, 1673, and is witnessed by one Robert Maltbye.
The “Dwight Strong Genealogy” states on page 354, “John Maltby, Sr., came with his brother William, both of the rank of gentleman,’ from Yorkshire, England, to New Haven, about 1670.”
It may be that the emigrants were not direct from Yorkshire, but it seems almost certain that they were of the Yorkshire Maltbys. If we can prove this fact we shall have established our descent from one of the oldest families in England—descending probably form “Crowned Heads.” Hugo de Maltby held lands in Englandat the time of the Norman Conquest and


*A reproduction of William Maltby’s Tombstone appears with the secretary’s second annual report published in the latter part of this Booklet.



56 OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR

it is so recorded in the Doomsday Book. Prior to this, the Maltbys were undoubtedly Danes, and came down in the Viking ships, landing on the northeastern coast of England. The name Maltby shows the Danish origin—by meaning town—and the malt may have meant grain, or some think it is derived from mael—mahel—mill.
What the life of William and John Maltby was in Englandwe can only surmise. They evidently lived near the coast and were probably sea-faring people. If fact it seems very probable that they left Englandin their own ships, and sailed for the New Worldvia the West Indies. Probably they had relatives living in the West Indiesas we know that Christopher Maltby, alderman of York, buried his wife in St. Croixabout the year 1600. Mrs. Christopher had a sister Jane, married in 1604, and it seems to the writer, that they were very probably nearly related to the father of William Maltby.
We know that our American Maltbys had interests in the West Indiesas we find in the Inventory of the estate of William Maltby Jr.:

35 13 7.5
The Estate Dr.to Mr. John
Morris, for freight, 17 3
84

M. Maltbie, widow, April 20, 1701 18 10 4.5
(Note—Mr.John Morris was probably his father-in-law, as he married Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. John Morris.)
As we have been unable to secure facts pertaining




OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR 57

to the early life of our emigrant ancestor we have had to resort to deduction,k and after many years of studying the situation, the following ideas have been woven together. Probably the father of William and John died when they were small, or we should have had some information as to their father’s name—or we should probably find William or John being called “Junior.” From the names of William’s children we con form some idea as to what his parents were named. Let us look at at these names:
1. John Maltby, b……. (perhaps named for his father.
2. Jane Maltby, b…….(perhaps for his wife Hannah or Jane.)
3. Mary Maltby, b. 1672 mother.
4. William Maltby, b. 1673, for himself-perhaps his grandfather
5. Elizabeth, born 1676, (perhaps a near relative.)
6. Daniel Maltby, b. 1679
7. Samuel Maltby, b. 1693 ! (evidently Bishop
8. Jonathan Maltby, b. 1698 ! family names.)

(The above names are given here so they may be compared with those found in the English research work on another page.)
Suppose their father to have died early in life, and possibly their mother married again, it would have left the emigrants with few home ties, and a natural step would be for them to seek their fortune in the New World, and especially so, if they already had relatives in the West Indies.
It will be noticed that no dates of birth are given for John (2), Jane (2), and this is because we do not know where they were born. They might have been born in England, or the West Indies. Neither do we know where William Maltby was married, but we feel very sure that the name of his first wife was Hannah—as we find William and Hannah Maltby together joining the church in Branford in the year 1688. Where Hannah Maltby died is not known, though she was living in 1689-90 as she signs as witness a deed of John Yales, at this date.




58 OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR

I believe the earlist record frund of William Maltby is the birth of his daughter Mary, born in 1672, and recorded in New Haven, Conn.
The earliest mention of the name as yet found is under date 1664 when “I” (probably J.) Maltbie witnessed a deed for Alexander Bryan. (Alexander Bryan was the grandfather of Mary Bryan, who later married John Maltby the emigrant.)
It is interesting to know womething of the social standing and prosperity of our emigrant ancestor in New England, and this can best be done by quoting various authors:
“Among the men who came to Branford soon after the Newarkexodus (about 1666) were Eleazer Stent, William Rosewell, William Maltbie and Samuel Pond. They became especially prominent”—Baldwinin his Brantford Annals (N. H. Hist. Soc. Papers, Wol. III, p. 265) and on page 270:
“The Wilfords, Maultbies, Bakers and Johnsons, that are leading names in Brantfordat this time, were of the merchant class and apparently wealthy. They became large land holders.
The Society at Branford at this time must have been most select, comprising the governor and others named,” etc.
Annals of Branford, page 300: “Large and most substantial houses were erected by the new settlers, some of whom were possessed of considerable property. This was especially true of the Bartholomews, Maltbies, Wilfords, Greys, Stents, Goulds, Bakers, Barnes and Bladestones. * * * The Hoadley, Maltbie, Rose, Foote and Harrison families present so many names that were prominently identified with




OUR EMIGRANT ANCESTOR 59

the Church, Town and business during this period, time fails me to speak individually of them.”
There are many other records, private and public to show that the Maltbys were a prominent Connecticutfamily.
William Maltb’s public life can best be shown by quoting from the “Public Records of Connecticut.”
In these records his name is variously recorded as:
Maultbey—Maltbey—Malbye—Maltby—Malby—Maltbie and Malbury.

Page 2—Special Courtheld at HartfordAug 29, 1689– Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford.
Page 3—A General Court at HartfordOct 16, 1689, Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford, Deputy.
Page 15—Gen. Courtat HartfordApril 11, 1690; Mr. Wm. Maltby for Branford.
Page 23—Gen. Courtat HartfordMay 8, 1690; Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Franford.
Page 42—Court of Election at HartfordMay 14, 1691; Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford.
Page 54—Special Courtat HartfordJuly 9, 1691; Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford.
Page 55—Gen. Courtat Hartford Oct. 8, 1691; Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Brantford.
Page 105—Gen, Court at HartfordOct, 12, 1693, Mr. Wm. Maltby, fo rBranford.
Page 120—Court of Election at HartfordMay 10, 1694; Mr. Wm. Maltby, for Branford.


tie.